Sanovas LLC, Logo (347) 990-2382

Company News


SANOVA is Awarded Phase II on a NAVY SBIR

January 14th, 2014

SANOVA is Awarded Phase II on a NAVY SBIRLong Island City, NY - January 14, 2014: Advanced metallurgy research center SANOVA was notified that it has been awarded the Navy SBIR Phase II as a continuation of the Phase I and Phase I Option work performed on SBIR topic N102-142: “Improved Gear Carburization Process“. Purpose of this project is development of a robust carburizing method for deep internal splines with a high aspect ratio, used in CH-53K heavy-lift helicopter program.

SANOVA was awarded Phase I on this SBIR in October of 2010. Upon successful completion of the Phase I and Phase I Option stages of the SANOVA was asked to submit a proposal for Phase II. SANOVA submitted the Phase II Proposal which was accepted by the Navy and resulted in this Phase II award.

DESCRIPTION: The most common carburizing processes for aerospace gearing are conventional gas carburizing and vacuum carburizing. Both of these methods rely on carburizing gas circulation to achieve uniform carburization of surfaces. For both carburizing methods, a high part aspect ratio (e.g. internal bore length to the internal bore diameter ratio of greater than 3:1) can cause a reduction / restriction of gas circulation to the internal volume of the part, which limits the producibility of the carburized internal features such as splines.

Innovative carburizing processes are sought for internal, potentially high aspect ratio surfaces that provides uniform coverage and case hardening depth and the avoidance of free-carbon formation or sooting. Target applications for this technology are gears ranging in size from 4 to 44 inches in diameter, including Herringbone Pinions with an internal aspect ratio of approximately 5:1. The proposed process should also be efficient in energy usage and time allotment and conducive to mass production.

PHASE I: Develop the concept and demonstrate the technical feasibility of the proposed carburizing method. Define mass production requirements and obstacles.

PHASE II: Develop and demonstrate the process through the carburization of representative internal spline samples along with evaluation and testing of the samples.

PHASE III: Complete all required qualification/certification testing and transition the technology to the Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM’s).

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: An improved internal gear carburization process would be beneficial for commercial aviation, automotive and commercial and military nautical applications.

Return To Home →


SANOVA is Awarded Phase II on a NAVY SBIR

March 19th, 2013

SANOVA is Awarded Phase II on a NAVY SBIRLong Island City, NY – March 19, 2013: Advanced metallurgy research center SANOVA was notified that it has been awarded the Navy SBIR Phase II as a continuation of the Phase I and Phase I Option work performed on SBIR topic N092-117: “Optimized Corrosion Resistant Bearing and Gear Steel Thermal Processing“. Purpose of this project is development of highly effective treatment technology for a custom steel alloy Pyrowear® 675, used in the F-35 – Joint Strike Fighter program.

SANOVA was awarded Phase I on this SBIR in August of 2009. Upon successful completion of the Phase I and Phase I Option stages of the SANOVA was asked to submit a proposal for Phase II. SANOVA submitted the Phase II Proposal which was accepted by the Navy and resulted in this Phase II award.

TOPIC DESCRIPTION: Pyrowear® 675 is an advanced high temperature corrosion resistance case carburized bearing and gear steel that has been shown to offer significant improvements in bearing performance, providing increased benefits to turbine machinery operating in a marine environment. Conventional carburizing techniques have had limited success in meeting all required properties necessary for bearing and gear performance. Typically, these basic mechanical properties and microstructures can be achieved, but corrosion resistance is not substantially better than conventional bearing steels like M50, 52100, or 440C. An innovative approach is needed to thermal process Pyrowear 675 to yield a steel meeting all of the necessary mechanical properties and possessing superior corrosion resistance for military gas turbine engines. The advanced thermal process should be optimized for high temperature turbine engine application in a marine environment.

Return To Home →


SANOVA Developes Technology Prototype for Treatment of Engine Valves

September 12, 2011

SANOVA Developes Technology Prototype for Treatment of Engine ValvesLong Island City, NY - September 12, 2011: Advanced metallurgy research center SANOVA has completed development of treatment technology prototype LINTERTITANIUM-VALVE™ for highly effective processing of titanium engine valves. This new technology protects the seat-contact perimeter of the valve head – area where most valves fail due to excessive wear – with an extremely durable custom diffusion protective case generated in just minutes of processing.

In its quest to tackle world’s most challenging metal treatment tasks, SANOVA has developed new proprietary technology prototype for highly effective processing of engine valves made from Ti alloys. This exciting new technology rapidly and efficiently generates durable protective diffusion (not PVD!) surface layer along the seat-contact perimeter of the valve head, with case depth of 20-25 µm, case micro-hardness of Hk100 1100-1250 (76-82 HRC), transition zone thickness of 250-350 µm and nitrogen content in case of 10-15% wt.

LINTERTITANIUM-VALVE™ is a completely new technology which dramatically improves and extends the service life of an engine valve. SANOVA has commenced active marketing of the new valve technology to engine manufacturers and their suppliers. If you are interested in implementing this technology please contact Gene Ostrovsky @ (718) 392-0009 (or via email to genost@sanovallc.com) for more information.

Return To Home →


SANOVA Develops Technology Prototype for Treatment of Powder Metallurgy Titanium Components

May 12, 2011

SANOVA Develops Technology Prototype for Treatment of Powder Metallurgy Titanium ComponentsLong Island City, NY - May 12, 2011: Advanced metallurgy research center SANOVA has successfully developed and tested fist technology prototype for effective processing of Ti components manufactured by powder metallurgy method. This new technology generates robust protective coating on the surface of Ti powder components which dramatically increases surface hardness and strength and reduces friction coefficient while maintaining desired substrate properties.

In addition to generating robust properties of such Ti component, new SANOVA technology possesses the unique ability to turn the regular metallic-silver color of the raw component into a highly desirable black finish, which can be left with the matte finish or polished to a mirror-like surface.

This new technology, which dramatically improves performance and extends service life and appearance of any powder metallurgy Ti component, was developed on the basis of SANOVA’s patented base technologies LINTERPROCESS™ and LINHEAT™.

SANOVA has commenced active marketing of the new powder Ti technology. If you are interested in implementing this technology please contact Gene Ostrovsky @ (718) 392-0009 (or via email to  genost@sanovallc.com) for more information.

Return To Home →


SANOVA Receives Phase I NAVY SBIR Award

March 8, 2011

SANOVA Receives Phase I NAVY SBIR AwardLong Island City, NY - October 25, 2010: Advanced metallurgy research center SANOVA was notified that it received Navy SBIR 2010.2 Phase I award in response to the proposal submitted for solicitation N102-142: “Improved Gear Carburization Process“. Purpose of this project is development of a robust carburizing method for deep internal splines with a high aspect ratio, used in CH-53K heavy-lift helicopter program.

DESCRIPTION: The most common carburizing processes for aerospace gearing are conventional gas carburizing and vacuum carburizing. Both of these methods rely on carburizing gas circulation to achieve uniform carburization of surfaces. For both carburizing methods, a high part aspect ratio (e.g. internal bore length to the internal bore diameter ratio of greater than 3:1) can cause a reduction / restriction of gas circulation to the internal volume of the part, which limits the producibility of the carburized internal features such as splines.

Innovative carburizing processes are sought for internal, potentially high aspect ratio surfaces that provides uniform coverage and case hardening depth and the avoidance of free-carbon formation or sooting. Target applications for this technology are gears ranging in size from 4 to 44 inches in diameter, including Herringbone Pinions with an internal aspect ratio of approximately 5:1. The proposed process should also be efficient in energy usage and time allotment and conducive to mass production.

PHASE I: Develop the concept and demonstrate the technical feasibility of the proposed carburizing method. Define mass production requirements and obstacles.

PHASE II: Develop and demonstrate the process through the carburization of representative internal spline samples along with evaluation and testing of the samples.

PHASE III: Complete all required qualification/certification testing and transition the technology to the Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM’s).

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: An improved internal gear carburization process would be beneficial for commercial aviation, automotive and commercial and military nautical applications.

Return To Home →


SANOVA Receives Phase I NAVY SBIR Award

March 7, 2011

SANOVA Receives Phase I NAVY SBIR AwardLong Island City, NY - May 04, 2010: Advanced metallurgy research center SANOVA was notified that it received Navy SBIR 2010.1 Phase I award in response to the proposal submitted for solicitation N101-086: “Advanced Rail Materials for Electromagnetic Launchers“. Purpose of this project is development of tough, erosion/high-temperature resistant metal alloys, metal composites, or advanced coatings to be used as electrically conducting rails in an electromagnetic (EM) launcher (electric rail gun).

DESCRIPTION: The US Navy is pursuing the development of an electromagnetic launcher (also known as a rail gun) for long range naval surface fire support. An electromagnetic launcher consists of two parallel electrical conductors, called rails, and a moving element, called the armature. Current is passed down one rail, through the armature, and back through the other rail. The armature is accelerated down the barrel due to the interaction between this magnetic field and current flow (Lorentz Force). An electromagnetic rail gun (EMRG) system will accelerate projectiles to hypersonic speeds, enabling ranges beyond 200 NM in less than 6 minutes of flight time while traversing the atmospheric spectrum (endo-exo-endo). The EMRG can address time-critical targets with a rate-of-fire of 6 to 10 rounds per minute while residual energy at target impact provides lethal effects. This operation occurs in an environment consisting of strong magnetic fields, high temperatures, chemical interactions and strong lateral forces on the rails and armature in the launcher bore.

A pair of electrically conductive rails acts to transfer the power supply current down their length and through the moving armature creating an accelerating Lorentz force. These rails also provide lateral guidance to the armature. The face of this rail material must be able to withstand the severe mechanical, electrical, and thermal environment present in the bore of a high power electromagnetic launcher. This surface must be able to survive sliding electrical contact of an aluminum armature and polymer bore rider materials at velocities up to 2.5 km/sec, and possibly concurrent balloting loads. In order to survive these conditions, the rail material must be electrically conductive to high currents approaching 6 MA, resistant to high transient temperatures, possess high hardness and yield strength and retain these properties after thermal transients, must accommodate balloting loads, and survive exposure to molten armature metals. The material is required to resist thermal breakdown and interaction in the presence of plasma due to high current electrical arcing and shocked gas. The material must eventually be manufacturable as well as affordable for these dimensions. Alternatively, potential protective layers may be considered such as bonded claddings, jackets, surface coatings or treatments. For purposes of managing electrical current distribution and mechanical stresses, approaches that permit grading of material properties such as electrical conductivity, thermal expansion coefficient, elastic modulus near the sliding surface would be particularly attractive.

PHASE I: Develop a rail material/coating and process approach to manufacture electrically conductive bore materials. Conduct any necessary subscale tests needed to show that the proposed process is suitable for Phase II demonstration. Create sample rail coupons for static or small scale testing and verification, such as strength, erosion resistance, and conductivity versus temperature from ambient to 500 degrees C.

PHASE II: Produce samples of electrically conductive rail materials of at least 1 m length that meet the needs of the EM launcher environment. Demonstrate that the material provides the required material property characteristics described above. Further develop and demonstrate the fabrication or joining processes for creating longer sections. Also demonstrate fabrication technology to create non-planar contact surfaces facing the bore. Produce a prototype set of coupons 1 m long and of full rail cross section, for testing in a small scale EM launcher. The EM launcher test facility may be provided as government furnished asset, or via a teaming relationship with other EM launcher test sites. Potential test sites include various scale railguns operated by Universities and Defense contractors. The results of testing may be classified. The Phase II product may become classified.

PHASE III: Develop process for full length (7-12 meters) rails with final design dimensions in other axes. The materials process developed by the Phase II effort will be applied to Navy railgun proof of concept demonstration and design efforts in the lab as well as industry advanced barrel contractors. Successful rail materials solutions will be installed in a weapon system on board ship upon transition to PEO IWS, PMS 405, ONR Program Office and integration with industry launcher manufacturers’ production weapon systems that will be sent to the fleet.

Return To Home →


SANOVA Receives Phase I NAVY SBIR Award

October 25, 2010

SANOVA Receives Phase I NAVY SBIR AwardLong Island City, NY - October 25, 2010: Advanced metallurgy research center SANOVA was notified that it received Navy SBIR 2010.2 Phase I award in response to the proposal submitted for solicitation N102-142: "Improved Gear Carburization Process". Purpose of this project is development of a robust carburizing method for deep internal splines with a high aspect ratio, used in CH-53K heavy-lift helicopter program.

DESCRIPTION: The most common carburizing processes for aerospace gearing are conventional gas carburizing and vacuum carburizing. Both of these methods rely on carburizing gas circulation to achieve uniform carburization of surfaces. For both carburizing methods, a high part aspect ratio (e.g. internal bore length to the internal bore diameter ratio of greater than 3:1) can cause a reduction / restriction of gas circulation to the internal volume of the part, which limits the producibility of the carburized internal features such as splines.

Innovative carburizing processes are sought for internal, potentially high aspect ratio surfaces that provide uniform coverage and case hardening depth and the avoidance of free-carbon formation or sooting. Target applications for this technology are gears ranging in size from 4 to 44 inches in diameter, including Herringbone Pinions with an internal aspect ratio of approximately 5:1. The proposed process should also be efficient in energy usage and time allotment and conducive to mass production.

PHASE I: Develop the concept and demonstrate the technical feasibility of the proposed carburizing method. Define mass production requirements and obstacles.

PHASE II: Develop and demonstrate the process through the carburization of representative internal spline samples along with evaluation and testing of the samples.

PHASE III: Complete all required qualification/certification testing and transition the technology to the Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM's).

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: An improved internal gear carburization process would be beneficial for commercial aviation, automotive and commercial and military nautical applications.

Return To Home →


SANOVA Receives Phase I NAVY SBIR Award

May 04, 2010

SANOVA Receives Phase I NAVY SBIR AwardLong Island City, NY - May 04, 2010: Advanced metallurgy research center SANOVA was notified that it received Navy SBIR 2010.1 Phase I award in response to the proposal submitted for solicitation N101-086: "Advanced Rail Materials for Electromagnetic Launchers". Purpose of this project is development of tough, erosion/high-temperature resistant metal alloys, metal composites, or advanced coatings to be used as electrically conducting rails in an electromagnetic (EM) launcher (electric rail gun).

DESCRIPTION: The US Navy is pursuing the development of an electromagnetic launcher (also known as a rail gun) for long range naval surface fire support. An electromagnetic launcher consists of two parallel electrical conductors, called rails, and a moving element, called the armature. Current is passed down one rail, through the armature, and back through the other rail. The armature is accelerated down the barrel due to the interaction between this magnetic field and current flow (Lorentz Force). An electromagnetic rail gun (EMRG) system will accelerate projectiles to hypersonic speeds, enabling ranges beyond 200 NM in less than 6 minutes of flight time while traversing the atmospheric spectrum (endo-exo-endo). The EMRG can address time-critical targets with a rate-of-fire of 6 to 10 rounds per minute while residual energy at target impact provides lethal effects. This operation occurs in an environment consisting of strong magnetic fields, high temperatures, chemical interactions and strong lateral forces on the rails and armature in the launcher bore.

A pair of electrically conductive rails acts to transfer the power supply current down their length and through the moving armature creating an accelerating Lorentz force. These rails also provide lateral guidance to the armature. The face of this rail material must be able to withstand the severe mechanical, electrical, and thermal environment present in the bore of a high power electromagnetic launcher. This surface must be able to survive sliding electrical contact of an aluminum armature and polymer bore rider materials at velocities up to 2.5 km/sec, and possibly concurrent balloting loads. In order to survive these conditions, the rail material must be electrically conductive to high currents approaching 6 MA, resistant to high transient temperatures, possess high hardness and yield strength and retain these properties after thermal transients, must accommodate balloting loads, and survive exposure to molten armature metals. The material is required to resist thermal breakdown and interaction in the presence of plasma due to high current electrical arcing and shocked gas. The material must eventually be manufacturable as well as affordable for these dimensions. Alternatively, potential protective layers may be considered such as bonded claddings, jackets, surface coatings or treatments. For purposes of managing electrical current distribution and mechanical stresses, approaches that permit grading of material properties such as electrical conductivity, thermal expansion coefficient, elastic modulus near the sliding surface would be particularly attractive.

PHASE I: Develop a rail material/coating and process approach to manufacture electrically conductive bore materials. Conduct any necessary subscale tests needed to show that the proposed process is suitable for Phase II demonstration. Create sample rail coupons for static or small scale testing and verification, such as strength, erosion resistance, and conductivity versus temperature from ambient to 500 degrees C.

PHASE II: Produce samples of electrically conductive rail materials of at least 1 m length that meet the needs of the EM launcher environment. Demonstrate that the material provides the required material property characteristics described above. Further develop and demonstrate the fabrication or joining processes for creating longer sections. Also demonstrate fabrication technology to create non-planar contact surfaces facing the bore. Produce a prototype set of coupons 1 m long and of full rail cross section, for testing in a small scale EM launcher. The EM launcher test facility may be provided as government furnished asset, or via a teaming relationship with other EM launcher test sites. Potential test sites include various scale railguns operated by Universities and Defense contractors. The results of testing may be classified. The Phase II product may become classified.

PHASE III: Develop process for full length (7-12 meters) rails with final design dimensions in other axes. The materials process developed by the Phase II effort will be applied to Navy railgun proof of concept demonstration and design efforts in the lab as well as industry advanced barrel contractors. Successful rail materials solutions will be installed in a weapon system on board ship upon transition to PEO IWS, PMS 405, ONR Program Office and integration with industry launcher manufacturers' production weapon systems that will be sent to the fleet.

Return To Home →


SANOVA Receives Phase I NAVY SBIR Award

January 27, 2010

SANOVA Receives Phase I NAVY SBIR AwardLong Island City, NY - January 27, 2010: Advanced metallurgy research center SANOVA was notified that it received Navy SBIR 2009.3 Phase I award in response to the proposal submitted for solicitation N093-178: "Innovative Concepts for Lightweight, Low-Cost, High Temperature Turbine Components". Purpose of this project is development of highly effective low-cost treatment technology for lightweight, high temperature turbine components that are of complex shape and capable of surviving 2200 °F or greater as required for hot-section non-rotating aero-turbine engine applications.

DESCRIPTION: In order to meet increased mission demand for naval aircraft, gas turbine engines require lighter weight and lower cost components that are durable at high temperatures. To help satisfy this demand, low-cost, high temperature concepts for excellent shape forming capability are needed. Proposed solutions are for application to complex shaped non-rotating (stationary) components in small aero-turbine engines, as utilized in naval aircraft propulsion and power systems. The proposed concepts should exhibit most of the following characteristics:- Able to replace the superalloys with domestically sourced elements- Lightweight with densities lower than superalloys - Easy to fabricate to near-net solid and hollow thin-wall shapes- Easily machined to complex curvatures and tight tolerances - Posses fracture toughness sufficient to avoid brittle behavior & excellent impact damage tolerance- Potential to live in turbine engine environments of 2200 degrees F or greater- Erosion, corrosion, and oxidation resistance - Potential for low coefficient of thermal expansion, below superalloy expansion rates - Sufficiently high thermal conductivity to not be considered an insulator or barrier.

The proposed concept are expected to be prototypically proven in hot vanes and outer shrouds, in both cooled (hollow) and un-cooled (solid) configurations. The Navy is seeking novel alternatives to state-of-the-art superalloys and commercial off the shelf CMC's.

Coordination with military turbine engine manufacturers is highly encouraged.

PHASE I: Develop concepts for lightweight, low-cost, high temperature turbine components that are of complex shape and capable of surviving 2200 degrees Fahrenheit or greater as required for hot-section non-rotating aero-turbine engine applications. Demonstrate feasibility of the proposed approach through analysis and/or limited testing.

PHASE II: Fully develop the identified concept from Phase I and produce a prototype component for limited bench type testing.

PHASE III: Fully develop and qualify concepts. Commercially produce lower-cost improved components for turbine engines used by US Navy, DOD, and civil markets.

PRIVATE SECTOR COMMERCIAL POTENTIAL/DUAL-USE APPLICATIONS: The technology is directly transferable to current and future, military and commercial, gas turbine engine programs or systems that use superalloys for high-temperature resistance.

Return To Home →


SANOVA Scientists Achieve Thermo-Resistance Breakthrough

September 20, 2009

SANOVA Scientists Achieve Thermo-Resistance BreakthroughLong Island City, NY - September 20, 2009: Advanced metallurgy research center SANOVA announced that its scientists successfully developed new thermo-chemical process, based on its patented LINTERPROCESS™ and LINHEAT™ technologies, which dramatically enhances temperature resistance of titanium alloys.

SANOVA has commenced active marketing of this new technology. If you are interested in implementing this technology please contact Gene Ostrovsky @ (718) 392-0009 (or via email to genost@sanovallc.com) for more information.

Return To Home →


SANOVA Receives Phase I NAVY SBIR Award

August 17, 2009

SANOVA Receives Phase I NAVY SBIR AwardLong Island City, NY - August 17, 2009: Advanced metallurgy research center SANOVA was notified that it received Navy SBIR 2009.2 Phase I award in response to the proposal submitted for solicitation N092-117: "Optimized Corrosion Resistant Bearing and Gear Steel Thermal Processing". Purpose of this project is development of highly effective treatment technology for a custom steel alloy Pyrowear® 675, used in the F-35 - Joint Strike Fighter program.

TOPIC DESCRIPTION: Pyrowear® 675 is an advanced high temperature corrosion resistance case carburized bearing and gear steel that has been shown to offer significant improvements in bearing performance, providing increased benefits to turbine machinery operating in a marine environment. Conventional carburizing techniques have had limited success in meeting all required properties necessary for bearing and gear performance. Typically, these basic mechanical properties and microstructures can be achieved, but corrosion resistance is not substantially better than conventional bearing steels like M50, 52100, or 440C. An innovative approach is needed to thermal process Pyrowear 675 to yield a steel meeting all of the necessary mechanical properties and possessing superior corrosion resistance for military gas turbine engines. The advanced thermal process should be optimized for high temperature turbine engine application in a marine environment.

Return To Home →